Polarization - Questions

The Polarization Concept Builder is comprised of 38 questions. The questions are divided into 19 different Question Groups. Questions in the same group are rather similar to one another. The Concept Builder is coded to select at random a question from each group until a student is successful with that group of questions.

This Concept Builder consists of three different activities. Those three activities are described as follows:
 
  • Charge Separation: Question Groups 1-4. Each question depicts a situation in which a charged object is brought near a neutral, conducting object. Students must decide how positive and negative charge within the conductor distributes itself. They must also identify the proper words that desribe the conductor, choosing as many that apply from among positively-charged, negatively-charged, electrically neutral, and polarized.
  • Particle Flow: Question Groups 5-12. Each question describes a physical situation in which a charged balloon is brought near a series of neutral, conducting and connected blocks. Some of the blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Learners must decide how charge rearranges itself on the blocks in the precence of the charged balloon. They must also identify the manner in which particles (protons, electrons) within the block move in order to cause such a distribution.
  • Induction Question Groups 13-19. Each question describes and animates a common electrostatic procedure in which a charged object is brought near to a neutral, conducting object in order to induce the movement of electrons within the neutral object. The neutral object is then touched by a hand in order to cause the movement of electrons between the object and the hand - in one direction or the other. Learners must identify the resulting charge on the object that was originally neutral and explain the charge in terms of particle movement.

The questions from each group are shown below. Teachers are encouraged to view the questions in order to judge which activities are most appropriate for their classes. We recommend providing students two or more options. 

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Polarization

 
Activity 1: Separation of Charge
Question Group 1
Question 1
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting sphere. When it is held near, what does the charge distribution on the metal sphere look like?
 
In this situation, the metal sphere is ______. Select all that apply.
negatively-charged
positively-charged
electrically neutral
polarized
 
 
Question 2
A positively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting sphere. When it is held near, what does the charge distribution on the metal sphere look like?
 
In this situation, the metal sphere is ______. Select all that apply.
negatively-charged
positively-charged
electrically neutral
polarized
 
 
 
Question Group 2
Question 3
A neutral, aluminum pie plate is brought near to a negatively-charged foam board. When it is held near, what does the charge distribution on the aluminum pie plate look like?
 
In this situation, the aluminum pie plate is ______. Select all that apply.
negatively-charged
positively-charged
electrically neutral
polarized
 

 
Question 4
A neutral, aluminum pie plate is brought near to a positively-charged foam board. When it is held near, what does the charge distribution on the aluminum pie plate look like?
 
In this situation, the aluminum pie plate is ______. Select all that apply.
negatively-charged
positively-charged
electrically neutral
polarized
 
 
 
Question Group 3
Question 5
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, metal pop can. When it is held near, what does the charge distribution on the metal can look like?
 
In this situation, the metal pop can is ______. Select all that apply.
negatively-charged
positively-charged
electrically neutral
polarized
 
 
Question 6
A positively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, metal pop can. When it is held near, what does the charge distribution on the metal can look like?
 
In this situation, the metal pop can is ______. Select all that apply.
negatively-charged
positively-charged
electrically neutral
polarized
 
 
 

 
Question Group 4
Question 7
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, metal bar. When it is held near, what does the charge distribution on the metal bar look like?
 
In this situation, the metal bar is ______. Select all that apply.
negatively-charged
positively-charged
electrically neutral
polarized
 
 
 
Question 8
A positively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, metal bar. When it is held near, what does the charge distribution on the metal bar look like?
 
In this situation, the metal bar is ______. Select all that apply.
negatively-charged
positively-charged
electrically neutral
polarized
 
 
 
 
 

 
Activity 2: Particle Flow
Question Group 5
Question 9
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question 10
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question Group 6
Question 11
A positively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question 12
A positively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question Group 7
Question 13
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question 14
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question Group 8
Question 15
A positively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question 16
A positively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

Question Group 9
Question 17
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question 18
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question Group 10
Question 19
A positively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question 20
A positively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question Group 11
Question 21
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question 22
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question Group 12
Question 23
A positively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 

 
Question 24
A positively-charged balloon is brought near a set of three blocks. Some blocks are conductors; others are insulators. Describe how the blocks become polarized and show what particle movement is involved to cause this polarization.
 


 
Activity 3: Induction
Question Group 13
Question 25
A positively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting sphere. When it is held near, the opposite side of the conducting sphere is touched. Touching the sphere causes it to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 
 
Question 26
A positively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting sphere. When it is held near, the opposite side of the conducting sphere is touched. Touching the sphere causes it to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Question Group 14
Question 27
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting sphere. When it is held near, the opposite side of the conducting sphere is touched. Touching the sphere causes it to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 
 
Question 28
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting sphere. When it is held near, the opposite side of the conducting sphere is touched. Touching the sphere causes it to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Question Group 15
Question 29
A positively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting can. When it is held near, the opposite side of the conducting can is touched. Touching the can causes it to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 
 
 
Question 30
A positively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting can. When it is held near, the opposite side of the conducting can is touched. Touching the can causes it to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 
 
 
 
Question Group 16
Question 31
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting can. When it is held near, the opposite side of the conducting can is touched. Touching the can causes it to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 
 
Question 32
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting can. When it is held near, the opposite side of the conducting can is touched. Touching the can causes it to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Question Group 17
Question 33
A positively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting bar. When it is held near, the opposite side of the conducting bar is touched. Touching the bar causes it to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 
 
Question 34
A positively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting bar. When it is held near, the opposite side of the conducting bar is touched. Touching the bar causes it to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Question Group 18
Question 35
A negatively-charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting bar. When it is held near, the opposite side of the conducting bar is touched. Touching the bar causes it to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 

 
Question 36
A negatively -charged balloon is brought near to a neutral, conducting bar. When it is held near, the opposite side of the conducting bar is touched. Touching the bar causes it to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 
 
 
 
Question Group 19
Question 37
A neutral, aluminum pie tin is held above a positively-charged foam board. When it is held above the foam, it is touched near the top rim. Touching the rim causes the bar to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 
 

Question 38
A neutral, aluminum pie tin is held above a negatively-charged foam board. When it is held above the foam, it is touched near the top rim. Touching the rim causes the bar to become _____.
a. negatively-charged
b. positively-charged
c. electrically neutral
 
What particle movement explains why this occurs? Tap to choose the appropriate explanation.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



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